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View, New York City, Wall Street, New York Stock Exchange with Trowbridge Addition, 1922

The New York Stock Exchange Building and New Addition
Adams & Grace, NYC: c. 1922 or later
Color-printed albertype
28 x 20.5 inches plate mark
34.25 x 23.5 inches overall
Price On Request

Large print of the New York Stock Exchange at Broad and Wall Streets, showing the main Greek Revival building (1903) designed by George Post and the 23-story tower added by architects Trowbridge and Livingston, which was completed in 1922. This example is imprinted in the lower right “Trowbridge & Livingston Architects of the Addition.” Perhaps it was issued as a promotion for the company. A different extant example is known, imprinted “compliments of J.S. Bache and Company New York, Chicago,” indicating that the print was also produced as promotional advertising by companies such as investment banks. The history of these prints is not definitively documented; it is possible their initial publication occurred around 1922, the year of the addition, and perhaps were later reissued.

Product Description Continues Below.

Description

Albertype was the first workable collotype process for printing photographic reproductions in quantity. The various collotype processes were employed commercially from the latter part of the 19th century to the mid 20th century, and the albertype process produced fine tonal gradations, making it especially suited for reproducing watercolor paintings. Eventually offset lithography made collotypes obsolete.

Condition: Generally very good with the usual overall light toning, wear, soft creases. Some faint mat toning from former mat, not obtrusive.

References:

Gambee, Robert. Wall Street Christmas. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1990, p. 43.

Pearce-Moses, Richard. “Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology: Albertype.” Society of American Archivists. 2005. http://www.archivists.org/glossary/term_details.asp?DefinitionKey=2482 (25 July 2006).

Additional information

Century

20th Century