John Milton
White Metal Figurine
Milton detail
detail

Milton
English or American:
3rd Quarter 19th Century
White metal figurine
15 inches high, 6.5 inches diameter base
$950

Standing statuette of the great British poet John Milton, raised on an ebonized metal round socle base with books at his feet to symbolize his vocation. He is portrayed naturalistically, his body turning and his face tilted slightly upward as if something has caught his attention. It was possibly issued in 1874, in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of Milton's death. An excellent library decoration.

John Milton (1608-1674) is one of the great English poets, known especially for his works Paradise Lost, considered by man the greatest epic poem in the English language, and Paradise Regained. Although he wrote some poetry as a young man studying at Cambridge University and immediately thereafter, in the 1640s he became occupied with the political turmoil of the English Civil War, publishing pamphlets advocating reform of the Church of England and writing Areopagitica, his famous defense of a free press. After the execution of Charles I, he served the government of Oliver Cromwell and continued to publish political works. Upon the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, he was forced into hiding for a period and later was included in the general amnesty. During this period, he began working in earnest on Paradise Lost. This epic poem tells the story of Satan's rebellion against God and his hand in the Fall of Adam and Eve. Paradise Regained is a sequel about Christ's temptation in the wilderness and his successful resistance, which in Milton's conception to a certain extent redeems humanity. Both works are admired for their vivid characterizations of the Biblical figures, and the beauty and richness of the language. Milton also is remembered for his fine sonnets and religious essays.

Condition: Generally very good with the usual overall light oxidation and wear.

Reference:

"John Milton." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th Ed. New York: Columbia University Press: 2001. (30 August 2002).