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Natural History Art, Birds, Chickens, Harrison William Weir, Antique Prints, 1873

$200

W.B.Tegetmeier (editor)
Harrison William Weir (1824-1906) (after)
Leighton Bros., London (printers)
Studies of Poultry, including Roosters, Hens, Turkeys, Ducks
from The Poultry Book: Comprising The Breeding & Management Of Profitable And Ornamental Poultry
George Routledge and Sons, Ludgate, London: 1873
Chromolithographs
11 x 7 inches
$200 each

Comprehensive series of prints of prize British roosters and hens, and other domestic fowl. Each bird is sensitively portrayed in a natural farm or henhouse setting, imbued with its own personality and temperament that seems to correspond to its appearance. Some prints show a single bird, others show two, either the more showy males, or a pair of male and female. The titles of the prints specify name of breed and prizes. Some also specify owner or name of the bird.

Product description continues below.

Description

Harrison Weir was a prolific and respected illustration artist of the Victorian era, specializing in animal subjects, especially domestic animals. Among his other credits are illustrations for Aesop’s Fables and other children’s books, a book about pigs and Our Poultry. He contributed pastoral scenes to books by Joseph Sylvester. Weir also organized and served as a judge for the first cat show in England in 1871, to cultivate awareness for what he viewed as the underappreciated “beauty and attractiveness” of domestic cats. His sensitive depictions of various breeds were published as Our Cats (1889).

Leighton, the printer of these works, was a pupil of the innovative printer George Baxter, and was the printer and publisher of the Illustrated London News between 1858 and 1885.

Condition: Generally very good, with the usual overall toning, wear, soft creases.

References:

Miller, Gail. “The Development of Cat Fancy in the UK.” Blue Persian Cat Society. 7 March 2002. http://www.bluepersian.ndirect.co.uk/history.html (9 March 2004).

Additional information

Century

19th C. Birds