Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798
Floor Globe on George III Mahogany Tripod Stand
Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798
Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798 Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798 Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798
Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798 Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798 Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798
Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798 Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798
Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798 Dudley Adams 18 Inch Terrestrial Globe: 1798
Dudley Adams (1762-1830)
18-Inch Terrestrial Floor Globe
London: c. 1798
Mahogany tripod stand
44 inches high, 24 inches diameter
Price on Request

A George III floor globe on a mahogany tripod stand by the Adams family, who were among the greatest scientific instrument and globe makers in Georgian England. This globe has handsome mellowed cream and olive colors, and is remarkably clear and readable. A similar Dudley Adams globe and stand dated 1802 was sold by George Glazer Gallery and is shown in our site archives.

The terrestrial globe is surmounted by a calibrated brass northern polar hour circle in a calibrated full brass meridian. The horizon band with engraved paper calendar and zodiac is supported by four curved quadrant uprights with ogee brackets where joined to the horizon; the quadrants are joined below the equator with a brass circular tropical ring characteristic of Adams globes. The tripod stand has a turned baluster standard and downswept legs ending in spade feet. The legs are centered over a medial compass stretcher with an engraved paper compass decorated with a sun with a face at the center surrounded by the block letter inscription "D. Adams Charing Cross London" and a working compass needle enclosed in glass.

Landmasses and waters are generally in various tones of olive and cream colors, with some green outlines. The western portion of the United States has minimal cartography, the western portion consisting of largely unexplored regions labeled Louisiana, Nova Mexico, Albion Teguayo, Quivira Regio, and, straddling the U.S.-Canadian border, "Blackfoot Ind." Australia is labeled Hollandia Nova. Antarctica is blank since the coastline was unexplored. The tracks of the voyages of Captains Cook and Furneaux are shown with hatched lines and the island of Hawaii ("O'wyhee") is labeled "Here Capt. Cook was Killed 1779." Wind currents are indicated by arrows. On the Equator in the Pacific Ocean at the 210 degrees east/150 degrees west longitude line is a small ornamental design from which rhumb lines radiate. The cartouche is centered above it.

The Adams family of globe makers was active throughout the 18th century and into the 19th century. Read more about them in our Guide to Globe Makers.

Cartouche Set in Wreath: Britanniarum/ REGI Augustissimo/ GEORGIO TERTIO./ Scientiarum Cultori pariter et Praesidio/ Globum hunc Terrestrem./ Omnes hactenus exploratos terrarum tractus, Ad./ Observationes Navigantium Itinerantium, et Astronomo/ rum recentiores accuratissime descriptos exhibentum/ Grati animi et pietatis monumentum/ D.D.Q./ Omni cultu et officio devinctissimius/ D. Adams./ Made by D. ADAMS, Globe Maker to the King, Ins’t Maker to his/ Majesty’s Ordn’ce, & Optician to H.R.H. The Prince of Wales,/ No. 60 Fleet Street London/ 1798.

Condition: Generally very good with the usual expected light scattered surface wear, staining, soiling, fading, toning, and abrasions, all professionally restored. Overall has a nice golden antique tone that many prefer, and is very clear and readable particularly for a globe of its age. Stand very good with the usual wear and shrinkage. Stand is of the period (early 19th century), but possibly associated. Wooden horizon band and compass stretchers restored or replaced.

References:

Dekker, Elly, et al. Globes at Greenwich: A Catalogue of the Globes and Armillary Spheres in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. London: Oxford University Press and the National Maritime Museum, 1999. p. 245.

Dekker, Elly and van der Krogt, Peter. Globes from the Western World. London: Zwemmer, 1993. p. 111-116.