Reliance: International Yacht Races 1903
Tin Commemorative Tray
Reliance: International Yacht Races 1903 Tin Tray
Reliance: International Yacht Races 1903 Tin Tray detail Reliance: International Yacht Races 1903 Tin Tray detail Reliance: International Yacht Races 1903 Tin Tray detail
Reliance: International Yacht Races 1903 Tin Tray
Reliance: International Yacht Races 1903
[Tin Commemorative Tray]

Savage Manufacturing Co., New York: c. 1903
Lithographed tin
5.75 inches diameter
$400

Small circular souvenir tin tip tray commemorating the International Yacht Races of 1903 and featuring the yacht Reliance in the center, which won the America's Cup that year.  The portrait of Reliance in full sail in shades of green is encircled by a dark green border with gold stars and anchors.  That, in turn, is within a wider border of the red, white and blue flags of several Northeastern U.S. yacht clubs within a looping rope design, which also incorporates an eagle with American flags, trophies to the left and right, and a design of two anchors and a ship's wheel at the bottom.  The disk is rimmed with a gold border.

The 1903 America's Cup Race was a contest between the Shamrock III, the British entry, and the American yacht Reliance.  They were notable as the largest British and American boats to race for the America's Cup -- Reliance was 145 feet overall.  According to maritime historians Anthony John and Ian Dear, "At just on 200 feet, Reliance's mast was staggering to behold -- it was of comparable height to Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square -- and was a feat of engineering in its own right."  Two months after racing for the Cup, Reliance was broken up and never raced again.

The Savage Manufacturing Company was a Brooklyn, New York, firm that made printed tin signs and objects.

Inscription: International Yacht Races 1903. Reliance. (clockwise from top) New York, Hull-Massachusetts, Philadelphia, Larchmont, Eastern, Indian Harbor, Beverly, New Rochelle, Manhasset Bay, Sachem's Head, Seawanhaka Corinthian, Atlantic, Brooklyn.

Marked on back with a lifeboat-shaped logo reading, "Savage M'f'g' Co. Brooklyn N.Y. Metal Signs and Tin Boxes."

Condition: Generally very good with minor overall toning, handling, scratches, oxidation.

Reference:

John, Anthony and Ian Dear, ed. The Early Challenges of the America's Cup (1851-1937). Sydney: Pierson, 1986. pp. 75 and 87.